05/15/2019
Town Hall Seattle
Last Friday, Town Hall hosted Moby, the famed singer-songwriter, musician, DJ, and photographer. We invited local writer Katharine Walker to sit in the audience and share her thoughts.
05/10/2019
Jonathan Shipley
Sunday, May 12, is Mother’s Day. Let’s look back, fondly, at the May 12, 1923 Town Crier as they wax poetic about mothers. Truth is, they sort of throw the mothers of 1923 under the bus!
05/08/2019
Alexander Eby
It’s fitting that Roman’s virtuosic talent will mark the first performance back in the newly renovated Great Hall. To welcome us back to Town Hall and fully explore the Great Hall's newly expanded acoustic capabilities, we've given the stage over to Joshua Roman for an evening of music under his full creative control.
05/08/2019
Town Hall Seattle
Acclaimed journalist Rachel Louise Snyder takes the Town Hall stage on May 21 to deliver a reckoning with the urgent and widespread problem of domestic violence with insight from her powerful new book No Visible Bruises.
05/07/2019
Jonathan Shipley
For 20 years, Camp Jitterbug has invited Seattle to learn from talented musicians and spectacular dancers. Now their incredible Jump Session Show returns, filling Town Hall’s stage with a celebration of Jazz, Tap, Lindy Hop, and Swing dances featuring some of the top dancers and musicians from around the world. It takes place on May 24 at Town Hall’s Great Hall.

An Interview with City Clerk Jaci Dahlvang

05/06/2019
Alexander Eby
I once asked Town Hall’s Ticketing Manager how often we get calls from people attempting to reach City Hall? “At least a couple per week. Maybe even one per day in the summer.” It didn’t take me long to wonder if City Hall got calls intended for us, and whether there was anything we could do to fix that. I had to know more. So in honor of the the 50th Annual Municipal Clerks Week I reached out to City Clerk Jaci Dahlvang, who answered questions all about phone call confusions and day-to-day life in city government.
05/03/2019
Jonathan Shipley
The May 3, 1919 edition of the Town Crier gave high praise to a concert that took place at the Swedish Tabernacle at the corner of Pike and Bellevue. Under the direction of Rudolph Muller, with Earl Alexander and Madame Else Grieg Andresen as assisting artists, the Norwegian Male Chorus had a stirring show.
  • Listening Guide
05/02/2019
Alexander Eby

 

In episode #33 of In The Moment, Chief Correspondent Steve Scher talks with Sandro Galea (3:55) about reforming America’s way of thinking about health. Galea invites us to think beyond just insurance and access to doctors or medicine, instead widening our scope to talk about larger systemic issues: how diseases that are biological,

05/01/2019
Town Hall Seattle
Can arts change our communities like they change our lives? ArtsFund will share pivotal research from their first-ever Social Impact of the Arts Study in King County on May 17 at Town Hall’s newly renovated Forum.
05/01/2019
Alexander Eby
Seattle is a city that demands we think outside the box, and few series exemplify this idea quite like Red May. For the month of May, speakers gather to interrogate contemporary issues through the lens of Marxism, political economy, feminism, race, and philosophy—and three of the festival’s marquee events are coming to paint Town Hall red.
04/25/2019
Jonathan Shipley
All is not well. The April 26, 1919 edition of the Town Crier laments the state of affairs within the Seattle Police Department. “There is ample room for the suspicion that all is not well with the police department of the city of Seattle.”
04/24/2019
Jonathan Shipley
What do you do when you realize you have everything you think you’ve ever wanted but still feel completely empty? In the summer of 1999, Moby released the album Play, arguably the album that defined the millennium and propelled him to stardom. But then it all fell apart.
04/22/2019
Jonathan Shipley
Town Hall’s marketing manager Jonathan Shipley chatted with Caoile, LUCO’s newly appointment music director, about Sibelius symphonies, the Mozart of our time, and what a conductor actually does up there on the podium.
04/19/2019
Jonathan Shipley
Oof. Cringe-worthy. There’s a small tidbit in the April 19, 1919 edition of the Town Crier entitled “Power.” It was only nine years after the state allowed women to vote.
  • Listening Guide
04/18/2019
Alexander Eby

In episode #32 of In The Moment, correspondent Valerie Curtis Newton talks with Cherríe Moraga (4:40) about her mother’s reinforcement of gender roles during Moraga’s lifetime and her mom’s eventual decline into Alzheimer’s. They discuss the ways in which physical memory goes along with generational trauma and how elders pass down the desire for change and the “-isms.” Moraga outlines the ways she uses writing to connects people with family and community,

04/17/2019
Jonathan Shipley
On April 27 at St. Mark’s Cathedral, the Seattle Baroque Orchestra and the Byrd Ensemble will present Georg Handel’s most enduring work, Messiah.

A Conversation with Metal Artist Karl Swanson

04/16/2019
Jonathan Shipley
We’re excited about all the possibilities of the space. One item in the new space is a functional piece of art—the lectern. Comprised primarily of 14-gauge cold-rolled steel and finished with acid patina and wax, the lectern’s height is electrically variable from 42” to 48” via linear actuator. Its body rolls on ‘ball races,’ typically used for heavy material handling, but reconfigured and manufactured as furniture casters, complete with brakes!

Contributed by Huma Ali, a TeenTix Press Corps editor

04/15/2019
Town Hall Seattle
Technology is in my life, your life—even your dog’s life. It has enabled us, as humans, to advance our society.
04/12/2019
Jonathan Shipley
There’s an ad in the April 13, 1929 edition of the Town Crier. It’s for the Exeter. The building is “a delightful place to live.” From bachelor rooms to family apartments, they’re “all tastefully furnished.” The Exeter is across the street from Town Hall. More? Our administrative offices are in that selfsame building!

Town Hall’s Temporary Certificate of Occupancy and How History Comes Full Circle

04/05/2019
Missy Miller
A century later, we find ourselves in a similar position—although thankfully our wait will only be a month as opposed to years. After 18 months of renovation, the Forum at Town Hall (formerly the Downstairs space) is opening a little ahead of schedule.
04/05/2019
Jonathan Shipley
In the April 5, 1919 edition of the Town Crier there was a story about the estimated speed of birds. It was entitled, “The Estimated Speed of Birds.”
  • Listening Guide

Hedrick Smith, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Lori Gottlieb

04/04/2019
Alexander Eby

In episode #31 of In The Moment, Chief Correspondent Steve Scher talks with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Hedrick Smith (3:45) about the incredible groundswell of community movements that took place around the time of the 2018 election.

04/02/2019
Jonathan Shipley
Mary Norris has had a lifelong fascination with Greece and the Greek language. Her new book is Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen. Norris will discuss the book, Greece, language, and the adventures she’s had there—amongst crumbling temples, olive trees, and ouzo—on May 1 at the Summit on Pike.
03/29/2019
Jonathan Shipley
The proud visage of Clark Nettleton graced the cover of the March 29, 1919 edition of the Town Crier. “Once upon a time our morning daily was the leading newspaper of the State of Washington,” the caption read.
03/27/2019
Jonathan Shipley
He’s opened wide the door to playing music for children. “It’s brought me a lot. It took me on a journey into my authentic self. It made me feel comfortable with love and unity and acceptance. It opened my heart and I can truly say I love the children I play for.”
03/26/2019
Jonathan Shipley
Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist. Lori Gottlieb is also a human. She, herself, went to psychotherapy. Soon, on April 10 at the Summit on Pike, she’ll talk to Luke Burbank about her career as a psychotherapist, what it means to give advice, and ponders the question of what we all want in life.
03/22/2019
Jonathan Shipley
For three days in late March, 1919, the Camp Lewis Players performed at Seattle’s Metropolitan Theater. The entertainment, the March 22, 1919 edition of the Town Crier reported, included “a new line-up consisting of eight in a number of vaudeville acts and a couple of one-act sketches.”
  • Listening Guide
03/21/2019
Alexander Eby
In episode #30 of In The Moment, correspondent and Grist editor Matt Craft sat down with journalist Dahr Jamail (2:17), Chief Correspondent Steve Scher interviews Siri Hustvedt (12:28), and host Jini Palmer highlights a  theatrical radio performance from the Mahogany Project for the 13th annual Urban Poverty Forum (24:16).
  • Video
03/21/2019
Jonathan Shipley
The sounds of South African Township music will emanate from Rainier Arts Center on March 29, when the legendary Lorraine Klaasen performs as part of Town Hall’s Global Rhythm Series.
03/20/2019
Wier Harman
Longtime donor and friend of Town Hall Chuck Nordhoff has stepped forward with additional matching dollars for donors who want to add their names to the Great Hall stage. He will match $50,000 for named plaque gifts made from now until April 15!
03/20/2019
Town Hall Seattle
Recently on the Town Crier, we were discussing a plague of Seattle Spring poets. With the Spring Equinox now upon us, let us celebrate in verse! Today we’ll be showcasing the poetry of Shin Yu Pai.
03/18/2019
Alexander Eby
Irene Butter is one of the few Holocaust survivors still writing about her experiences. On April 16, 2019 she joins us for a Town Hall conversation about taking action and refusing to be a bystander.
03/08/2019
Jonathan Shipley
“You Auto Go to the Auto Show” heralded the Town Crier in the March 8, 1919 edition. The particular issue was filthy with advertisements for cars, including ads for Oldsmobile, Pierce-Arrow, and Paige, “the most beautiful car in America.”
  • Listening Guide

John Lanchester, Frans de Waal, Jonathan Shipley

03/07/2019
Alexander Eby



In episode #29 of In The Moment, correspondent Katy Sewall talks with John Lanchester (3:58) about his book The Wall. They delve into Lanchester’s inspiration for the book—a recurring dream.

03/05/2019
Jonathan Shipley
There are thousands of living languages spoken in the world—and countless literary masterworks written in each of those languages. Translators like Michael Straus offer us a gateway to these incredible works of fiction and literary history.
03/01/2019
Jonathan Shipley
“The most delightful social events of the week,” the Town Crier enthused in their March 1, 1919 issue, “were the afternoon parties given Monday and Tuesday by Mrs. Albert Charles Phillips at her home on Queen Anne Hill. It was like a breath of the days before the wary for the member of society to meet and have a joyful time together without any anxiety.”
02/28/2019
Jonathan Shipley
There was a lengthy article in March 10, 1923 edition of the Town Crier about Spring Poets, and who they are, and how all Spring poems need to include doves. “The merry, merry season is almost at hand,” it begins. “That is to say, if another snow storm doesn’t hit us. Two or three times already it has looked as if Winter were rather slipping from her perch upon the lap of Spring, then the weather prediction would go all haywire again and we’d wake up in the morning to find the milk frozen and snow halfway to our knees.”
  • Listening Guide
02/25/2019
Jonathan Shipley
In this bonus episode of In The Moment  host Jini Palmer talks with Wier Harman while touring the Town Hall construction site. 
02/22/2019
Jonathan Shipley
The February 22, 1919 edition of the Town Crier had this bold prediction for 1919, “Doughnuts will be cut very large around the interior and will be loose-fitting and very plain, being entirely without trimming.”
02/21/2019
Alexander Eby
Our renovation has touched every corner of Town Hall. When the cranes clear out and the plaster is all swept up, some of our performance spaces will feel revitalized yet familiar—while others will get to introduce themselves all over again.
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