Sikh Captain America Combats Discrimination

This article was originally written and published as part of the TeenTix Press Corps, a program that promotes critical thinking, communication, and information literacy through criticism and journalism practice for teens. This piece was written and edited by members of the Teen Editorial Staff, the leadership board of the Press Corps. Town Hall is thrilled to partner with the TeenTix Press Corps to help amplify these young writers’ voices.  Written by Lily Williamson When I think about America, especially in our current political climate, I think about prejudice. Bigotry seems to have infected every part our nation and, as a…

What Are People Doing?

“All quiet along the Avenue,” the Town Crier notes, “and no place to go but home. That haven has had considerable responsibility thrown upon it, along with an unexpected attendance of husbands, all on account of the flu, as it is called for short.” The story continues, “The movies have ceased from moving and the vaudeville is at rest.”
The Spanish Flu was the deadliest disease outbreak since the Black Death roiled through Eurasia in the 14th century. Worldwide mortality estimates were between 50-100 million. Washingtonians were largely spared, though approximately 5,000 died in the epidemic.

Listening Guide: In The Moment Episode #23

 In episode #23 of In The Moment, sit in with our correspondent Lesley Hazleton as she talks with Michael Hebb (2:05) about her memories of one of his Death Over Dinner discussions. She shares her feelings of freedom and the depth of the kinship she felt at being able to talk openly about death with complete strangers. Hebb and Hazleton explore the philosophy of such deep and meaningful conversations, and how they have the power to transform our understanding of our mortality and ourselves. Chief Correspondent Steve Scher brings us back-to-back interviews. First he meets with acclaimed journalist and…

The Adventure Begins

The adventure began, as many adventures do, with Indiana Jones. Dylan Thuras was infatuated with the globetrotting hero. Thuras was 10-years-old, watching Indiana Jones movies and thinking about what he wanted to be when he grew up. His conclusion — an archeologist. “Then my mom told me what an archeologist actually did,” he says. “So then I wanted to direct movies. And then I wanted to illustrate comics. I’m 35 now, and it’s interesting that aspects of my work touch on all of that.” Thuras is the co-founder and creative director of Atlas Obscura, an online magazine and digital media…

What Are People Doing?

Every week the Town Crier blog will look back at Seattle’s near forgotten Town Crier magazine to see what was happening then and talk about what’s happening now. One of the largest sections of the original Town Crier was “What People Are Doing,” highlighting things like, “There was a large attendance at the Women’s University Club patriotic luncheon on Saturday,” and, “Clara Bicknell Ford, whose ballet and interpretive dancing has delighted Seattle audiences, is now studying with Kosloff of New York, probably the most famous teacher in the country.”  In this new series we’re revisiting the old column and tying…

Talking About Death Over Dinner

How do we want to die? Where do we want to be when our lives end, and what do we want to happen to us after we’re gone? It’s a topic we go to great lengths to avoid, from our hospitals to our homes. But for Michael Hebb, creating an environment for us to join our families at the table and have a conversation about the end of our lives is at the core of his work. Michael Hebb will be speaking on Town Hall’s stage on 10/11/2018 to explore ideas in his book Let’s Talk About Death (Over Dinner)….

Rock Talk with a Woman of the World

“It was always my belief that rock and roll belonged in the hands of the people, not rock stars,” Patti Smith once said. Evelyn McDonnell is doing her part to put  rock and roll in the hands of the people with her new book, Women Who Rock: Bessie to Beyonce. Girl Groups to Riot Grrrl. McDonnell, associate professor of journalism at Loyola Marymount University, will be at MoPOP on Friday, October 12th to discuss women who have defined musical history. But before taking our stage, she took a seat with Town Hall’s Jonathan Shipley to discuss having a crush on…

Welcome to the Town Crier

The original Town Crier was a weekly magazine, published between 1910 and 1938. It focused on Seattle’s news, arts, and culture. It represented a diversity of local voices, featuring artists, musicians, photographers, actors, and more, alongside reviews of local performances and discussions of local, national, and international events. The parallels to our own bustling, broad calendar are undeniable, and as we revitalize our century-old building (its set to reopen in March 2019!)—giving new life to an old name feels especially appropriate.

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