Jun 17, 2019
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Lawrence Lessig
Fidelity and the American Constitution
Monday, June 17, 2019, 7:30PM
The Great Hall

The immense age of our nation’s Constitution presents a fundamental challenge for interpreters. After so much time has passed, how do we read such an old document? Legal scholar Lawrence Lessig arrives at Town Hall to explore one of the most basic approaches to interpreting the Constitution—the process of translation. With insight from his new book Fidelity & Constraint, Lessig contends that some of the most significant shifts in constitutional doctrine are products of the evolution of the translation process over time. He describes how judges understand their translations as instances of “interpretive fidelity,” framing their judgements in the context of time. Lessig also highlights what he calls “fidelity to role,” a practice by which judges determine if old ways of interpreting the Constitution have become illegitimate because they do not match up with the judge’s perceived role. Lessig not only shows us how important the concept of translation is to constitutional interpretation, but also exposes the institutional limits on this practice. Sit in for a course on constitutional and foundational theory by one of America’s leading legal minds.

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School. He is the author of many books, including: Code 2.0; Free Culture; Remix; Republic, Lost; and most recently America, Compromised.


Presented by Town Hall Seattle.

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